Failure: Hide & Seek

Have you ever tried to hide your own ship from yourself? Nope?

Well. I did it. When we found a Covetor in a belt in Partod I quickly put my Warp Disruptor on it – sitting in my shiny Anathema – and waited for my corpmates to come and destroy the evil foe. Save the roids!, I say.

In about half armour the pilot ejected. Fine so far, about 18m for the ship plus fittings would go into our hangar; at least the thought so. I warped to a safe spot, ejected and went to grab the Covetor.

Way off the mark! I was playing with Romain, and Romain could not fly Mining Barges, Ash could but he was about 30 jumps off. I warped back to my safe just to find it empty. No CovOps waiting for its owner, just the cold of space. A short directional scan revealed that the Anathema was right behind me, in the direction from where I was coming.

Apparently tackling the Mining Barge had consumed most of my capacitor so I wasn’t able to reach the safe spot, dropping warp and leaving ship a few AU before reaching the bookmark…¬† so I was sitting in the pod, we had a pilotless Covetor sitting in the belt, a pilotless Anathema sitting on an unknown safespot, and my mates sitting at the belt guarding the treasure we couldn’t retrieve.

We tried to ransom the pilot (‘pay us and you can get your ship back’) but then a blob (‘smaller fleet’) consisting of several t2 cruisers entered the system, we quickly dispatched the Covetor but they got one of our ships tackled. The Vexor was gone fast.

While I was waiting at the safespot the former Vexor pilot went and grabbed his Helios to probe my ship, but he … failed. CovertOps and the relevant scanning skills to III and a t1 fitting instead of a Sisters Launcher with suitable probes is not enough to scan down another CovertOps.

I bought a Magnate – the Amarr t1 scanning frig – about 7 jumps away, bought also rigs and probes and flew back about half an hour later. I tried… and got the signature to 88% strength. At least more than the Helios was able to achieve …

I bought Sisters Scanner Probes right in this very system and tried it a second time. No matter how I moved the probes I did not get a stronger signal than 98.86%. About 100m ISK were floating in space, alone … waiting for someone to be found.

I bought a Sisters Expanded Probe Launcher (after I borrowed money of course, not that I could pay about 48m from my own wallet – poor pirate I am) and after flying 13 jumps back and forth I sent out my probes, quickly and this time successfully scanning down my beloved frigate.

Fail.

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The Skill of Lucky Timing

Timing… the ultimate griefer of history. The top scorer in every battle and competition. Men worship it as ‘skill’, ‘luck’ or just plain success.

In EVE, the timing is generally bad. If it was good, it doesn’t matter, the blob is already in warp right on top of you.

You activate your scram the second the prey warps out.

The very moment you enter a system a large fleet, including HICs and other nasty stuff assembled at the same gate as you’re cloaked at. They possibly even decloak you accidently. Of course they kill you.

Some random belt, with a mining Exequror in it. You warp in it, quickly lock and point the helpless ship. And while your guns start pounding at its shields it just warps of. The worst thing: You just changed your ship from the Incursus with a scrambler to your Vexor with the standard one point Warp Disruptor.

I am sure there are countless other examples of bad timing in everyone’s (EVE) life and I suppose bad timing is much easier to recognise than good timing, although bad timing is mostly the enemy’s skill and good timing your own luck.

Well.

A few days ago I had one of those moments of good timing, although this time it was really ‘luck’.

I entered Lantorn with my cheaply¬† fitted T1 Incursus, still three frigates to go until I would go back to my corp’s HQ in Genesis. A Factional Warfare mission beacon appeared on my overview. A short scan shows a Manticore … I was faster in warp than I could realize I was warping into a public mission.

About half way there a Vengeance appeared on scan as well, right on line with the Manticore. The warp tunnel began to collapse, shaking my nimble frigate and I left warp. The acceleration gate quickly grew larger and I realized the energy readings sent out by the structure.

The Amarr assault ship was initiating warp. When I had decelerated so much that I could navigate manually again, the Vengeance had left the scenery, leaving a juicy stealth bomber on my Light Neutron Blaster I’s mercy.

The shields melted fast and so did the rest of the expensive ship, when it finally exploded, with a few dozen rounds of Antimatter Charge S dug into its innermost structures, my ship was nearly intact.

My shields were gone but the majority of my armour plates was still there, so I quickly scooped the loot while the Manticore’s escape pod warped off (too bad).

Thats timing. Pure luck, nothing more.

How often do you find yourself in a certain situation thinking ‘if I had done this a second earlier I’d be dead’ or ‘good this Interceptor isn’t sensor boosted’? Too often.

Life is random. So is pvp.

What’s this post’s point? There is none. It’s just a public notice: Not everything is about skill, there’s a huge portion of luck involved in everything.